Erebot’s configuration

Erebot’s configuration is stored in an XML file. This file is usually called “Erebot.xml”, though you could name it otherwise and use the Erebot -c option when running Erebot to point it to your file.

This file is composed of a hierarchy of settings, with inner sections being able to inherit settings from outer sections.

The configuration is based on 3 structures:

  • general settings
  • logging configuration
  • IRC-related settings

The general settings include things such as information on the current timezone, the locale (language) the bot should use to display messages in the console, etc.

The logging configuration is what defines what information the bot will print to the logs, how the log are organized (do we store them in a syslog, a database, or print them directly in the console) and how they appear (how they’re formatted).

Last but not least, the rest of the configuration is dedicated to IRC, with information on what networks/servers the bot should contact, what modules it should enable, etc.

The rest of this page gives information on available options and possible values and is directly mapped to the actual hierarchy used in the XML configuration file.

Note

The tags may be used in any order. Therefore, one could swap the general configuration for <modules> with the configuration for the <logging> subsystem in the tree above. You still need to maintain the hierarchy however. Therefore, a <channels> or <servers> tag may only be a descendant of a <network> tag.

<configuration>

The <configuration> tag deals with settings related to the machine Erebot is running on more than to IRC itself.

The following table lists attributes of this tag with their role.

Valid attributes for the <configuration> tag
Attribute Default value Required Role
commands-prefix n/a Yes The prefix used to identify commands adressed to the bot. Common values include: !, ', @, etc.
daemon n/a No Whether to start the bot as a daemon (True) or not (False).
group n/a No Once started, assume that group’s identity (given as a GID or as a name).
language n/a Yes The preferred locale to use, as an IETF language tag (eg. en-US or fr-FR). The usual Linux format for locales (en_US) is also supported.
pidfile n/a No Store the bot’s PID in this file.
timezone n/a Yes This computer’s current timezone, eg. Europe/Paris. [1]
user n/a No Once started, assume that user’s identity (given as a UID or as a name).
version n/a Yes Must match the Erebot’s version. It is currently used as a failsafe to prevent the bot from running with an outdated configuration file.
[1]The list of supported timezones can be found on http://php.net/manual/en/timezones.php

Note

The values of the daemon, user, group & pidfile options can be overriden from the command-line. The values given here only act as default ones in case the command line does not override them.

<logging>

The logging system used by Erebot is highly customizable. It uses the same kind of API as the Python logging module as it is actually a port of that module for PHP, hence its name PLOP.

It was developped as a subproject of Erebot and ships with its own documentation.

<modules>

Each of the <configuration>, <network>, <server> and <channel> tags may have a <modules> subtag to specify which modules should be made available at that level.

This tag is a simple container for zero or more <module> tags.

<module>

This tag defines a module that will be available at the current level (ie. either globally or for the current network/server/channel).

Settings for a module at one level will override settings for the same module at some higher level (hence, settings for a module in a <channel> section will replace settings defined at the <network> level). <channel> is considered as being at a lower level as <server> for the purposes of this mechanism.

You may choose to enable/disable a module at a particular level by setting its active attribute to True or False (respectively).

The following table lists attributes of this tag, their default value and their role.

Valid attributes for the <module> tag
Attribute Default value Role
name n/a The name of the module to load/unload.
active True Indicates whether the module should be enabled at that level (True), or disabled (False).

A <module> tag may contain zero or more <param> tags to specify additional parameters the module should take into account (such as specific settings).

<param>

This tag can be used to define a parameter for a module. It has 2 (two) mandatory attributes, as described in the table below.

Valid attributes for the <param> tag
Attribute Default value Role
name n/a The name of the parameter.
value n/a The value for that parameter. Different types of values are accepted. The precise type to use depends on the module and parameter. Read each module’s documentation for more information.

A <param> tag may NOT contain any subtags.

<networks>

This tag is a simple container for zero or more <network>.

<network>

This tag represents an IRC network. The following table lists attributes of this tag with their role.

Valid attributes for the <network> tag
Attribute Default value Role
name n/a The name of that IRC network.

The <network> tag MUST contain a <servers> subtag, used to describe IRC servers belonging to that IRC network.

It may contain a <modules> subtag to change the settings of a module for this IRC server.

It may also contain a <channels> subtag to change the settings of a module for some IRC channels on this network.

<servers>

This tag is a simple container for one or more <server>.

<server>

This tag represents the configuration of an IRC server. The following table lists attributes of this tag with their role.

Valid attributes for the <server> tag
Attribute Default value Role
url n/a Connection URLs to use to contact this IRC server.

The url attribute contains a series of connection URLs. A connection URL simply gives information on how to connect to a particular IRC server. A valid connection URL looks like this: ircs://irc.iiens.net:7000/?verify_peer=0

The scheme part may be either irc for plain text communications or ircs for IRC over SSL/TLS (encrypted communications). The host part indicates the IP address or hostname of the IRC server. The port part can be used to override the default port value for the given scheme.

By default, plain text IRC uses port 194 while IRC over SSL/TLS uses port 994. However, since both of these ports require root permissions on linux to launch a server, most IRC servers use different values like 6667 or 7000 for plain text communications and 6697 or 7002 for encrypted communications.

Last but not least, additional parameters may be used to control various aspects of the connection phase. At present time, these settings only affect encrypted connections (IRC over SSL/TLS), but they may be later extended to affect plain-text connections as well. The following table lists currently supported parameters:

Valid parameters for connection URLs
Name Valid values Description
verify_peer 0 or 1 Check if the certificate really belongs to the target IRC server.
allow_self_signed 0 or 1 Consider self-signed certificates to be valid.
ciphers a list of ciphers separated by colons Acceptable ciphers to use to encrypt communications with the server.

See also http://php.net/manual/en/context.ssl.php for additional information on those settings.

You may also specify an HTTP or SOCKS 5 server through which the connection should be proxied by adding a proxy URL to the url attribute. Several proxies can be used by prepending their URLs to that attribute, separated by spaces:

<!-- Use an HTTP proxy with username/password authentication. -->
<server url="http://user:pass@proxy.example.com irc://irc.example.com"/>

<!-- Use a SOCKS 5 proxy with username/password authentication. -->
<server url="socks://user:pass@proxy.example.com irc://irc.example.com"/>

<!--
  Chain two proxies before connecting to the final IRC server.
  The first one is an HTTP proxy running on non-standard port 8080.
  The second one is a regular SOCKS proxy.
-->
<server url="http://http-proxy.example.com:8080/ socks://socks-proxy.example.com/ irc://irc.example.com"/>

Warning

As of this writing, Erebot does not support older versions of the SOCKS protocol (namely, SOCKSv4 and its derivatives).

This tag may contain a <modules> subtag to change the settings of a module for this IRC server.

<channels>

This tag is a simple container for zero or more <channel> tags.

<channel>

This tag represents the configuration of an IRC channel. The following table lists attributes of this tag with their role.

Valid attributes for the <channel> tag.
Attribute Default value Role
name n/a The name of the IRC channel being configured.

This tag may contain a <modules> subtag to change the settings of a module for this IRC channel.

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